Tour the town of Liverpool

Present Day May 1827 Aerial

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Town Of Liverpool
A.E. Smith Memorial A.E. Smith Memorial

A.E. Smith Memorial

The Memorial Lamp was unveiled in 1905 as a memorial to Private Albert Edward Smith. It was originally a gas lamp and stood close to where it stands now. In 1926 it was moved to the Memorial School of Arts, before it was subsequently moved to outside the Liverpool Memorial Olympic Pool in Memorial Avenue in 1965, before being moved to its current location on 30 May 2000, the centenary of Private Smith’s death. 

The lamp was originally intended to commemorate all the local soldiers who fought in the Boer War, but a lack of funds prevented other names being added. Forty three local soldiers fought in the Boer War, but Private Smith was the only local soldier who never returned home. Private Smith no longer resided in the Liverpool area when he enlisted in the Army, but his father was a local Police Sergeant. The memorial lamp is now located on the corner of Macquarie Street and Memorial Avenue, Liverpool. A plaque is located behind the A.E. Smith Lamp and is dedicated to the memory of some of the Boer War volunteers from the local district.

All Saints Roman Catholic Church All Saints Roman Catholic Church

All Saints Roman Catholic Church

The foundation stone to the original church was laid in 1840 by Archbishop Polding and the simple Gothic building was operational by 1842 costing 1500 pounds to build. The schools, Presbytery and Saint Anne’s Orphanage as well as the Convent of the Sisters of Charity were later built on the property. They were all demolished about 1964. A new church was built in 1963 on the other side of George Street adjacent to the old buildings. Built as an unorthodox barrel shape it has the feeling of gothic inspired simplicity.

Apex Park Apex Park

Apex Park

In 1811, 5 year old Thomas Tyrrell became the first recorded burial in Liverpool’s old burying ground after drowning in the George’s River. His burial record states, ‘The first buried in consecrated ground, Liverpool’. Subsequently the area of land was found to be excessively damp and as a result was abandoned as a cemetery in June 1821. Original records show one hundred and twenty three burials in the old burial ground between 1811 and 1821. Causes of death for these early residents vary from snake bite, poisoning from eating berries to excessive drinking.

The area was developed into a public park by the Apex Club in 1950. There are no remaining headstones in the park. The park itself stands as a memorial to the many Liverpool Pioneers’ who were buried there. The cause of their deaths recorded in the early burial register gives an insight into the harsh life of the early settlers. One of the early burials in the old burying ground was that of Nathaniel Lucas who was contracted to build St Luke’s Church at Liverpool in 1818. On 5 May 1818 his body was found in the mud of the river at Liverpool; his death was said 'to have proceeded from his own act, owing to mental derangement'.

Bigge Park Bigge Park

Bigge Park

Bigge Park was a part of the original early 19th century commons planned by the surveyor Meehan for the town of Liverpool. The park once extended to Scott Street and much of the present development dates back to the 1950’s.

Cast Iron Letterbox Cast Iron Letterbox

Cast Iron Letterbox

Chipping Norton Homestead Chipping Norton Homestead

Chipping Norton Homestead

Collingwood House

Collingwood House

Commercial Hotel Commercial Hotel

Commercial Hotel

Del Rosa Del Rosa

Del Rosa

Hotel Liverpool / Warwick Farm Hotel Hotel Liverpool / Warwick Farm Hotel

Hotel Liverpool / Warwick Farm Hotel

James Pirie Child Health Centre & Dr Pirie Community Complex James Pirie Child Health Centre & Dr Pirie Community Complex

James Pirie Child Health Centre & Dr Pirie Community Complex

Dr James Pirie died in July 1943. By November of that year the James Pirie Memorial Committee was established and looking to build a baby health centre in Liverpool. The Bigge Street site was selected and by the middle of 1946 the building was under way. The opening of the Infant Welfare Centre was at the end of 1948

Light Horse Park 1 and 2 Light Horse Park 1 and 2

Light Horse Park 1 and 2

Light Horse Park is located in Riverpark Drive Liverpool. Light Horse Park was officially opened on 11 November 1988 by Major General John Mcdonald assisted by Liverpool Mayor Gary Lucas. The park was named in honour of the Light Horse Regiments. The park contains a Memorial consisting of a concrete pillar engraved with two Light Horsemen on their mounts and a slouch hat. The base of the pillar contains a plaque dedicating the memorial to the Australian Light Horse.


Light Horse Park today provides an enjoyable recreation area for families. The traffic bridge above a section of the park was opened on March 15, 1958 and remained unnamed until 2008. It was known locally as the Liverpool Bridge or Newbridge Road Bridge. In 2008, Liverpool City Council held a naming competition for the bridge and ‘Light Horse Bridge’ was chosen to honour the Light Horse Regiments.

Liverpool Bridge Liverpool Bridge

Liverpool Bridge

Liverpool Court House Liverpool Court House

Liverpool Court House

Liverpool General Cemetery Liverpool General Cemetery

Liverpool General Cemetery

Liverpool Hospital Liverpool Hospital

Liverpool Hospital

Liverpool Pioneers' Memorial Park Liverpool Pioneers' Memorial Park

Liverpool Pioneers' Memorial Park

Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park is the site of the second burial ground for Liverpool. The Park is situated to the north of the Liverpool Central Business District and its boundaries are formed by Macquarie, Campbell and Northumberland Streets and the Hume Highway. The cemetery has often been referred to as ‘St Luke’s Cemetery’ but there is no formal connection between the burial ground and St Luke’s Church.

The first registered burial was that of Richard Guise which took place on April 16, 1821. Burials continued in this cemetery until 1958.

The Old Liverpool Cemetery Act, which was assented to on October 14 1970, enabled the cemetery to be converted from a public cemetery to a public park. Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park is the final resting place of thousands of people, many very prominent in the area’s early development and also in the early settlement of New South Wales. Amongst these are William Broughton, James Badgery, Thomas Moore and noted colonial artist Charles Rodius.

Liverpool Post Office

Liverpool Post Office

Liverpool Public School and Liverpool Superior School Liverpool Public School and Liverpool Superior School

Liverpool Public School and Liverpool Superior School

Liverpool Railway Station Liverpool Railway Station

Liverpool Railway Station

James Henry Atkinson of Sophienburgh turned the first sod for the railway line on 20 November 1855 at the south corner of Liverpool Green almost overlooking the weir on the George’s River. The following August the governor, Sir William Denison, declared the line from Granville to Liverpool open. Extending the line to Campbelltown, however, took another 3 to 4 years to complete. The first steam train journey of 13 kilometres,from Granville to Liverpool, with a stop at Fairfield, took 17 minutes.

Liverpool Regional Museum Liverpool Regional Museum

Liverpool Regional Museum

Liverpool Weir Liverpool Weir

Liverpool Weir

Milestone Cnr George St & Elizabeth Drv Milestone Cnr George St & Elizabeth Drv

Milestone Cnr George St & Elizabeth Drv

This simple sandstone milestone features finely incised inscriptions in Roman lettering. The milestone’s design suggests it pre-dates the 1854 milestones between Campbelltown and Liverpool.

Old All Saints Roman Catholic Church Old All Saints Roman Catholic Church

Old All Saints Roman Catholic Church

The foundation stone to the original church was laid in 1840 by Archbishop Polding and the simple Gothic building was operational by 1842 costing 1500 pounds to build. The schools, Presbytery and Saint Anne’s Orphanage as well as the Convent of the Sisters of Charity were later built on the property. They were all demolished about 1964. A new church was built in 1963 on the other side of George Street adjacent to the old buildings. Built as an unorthodox barrel shape it has the feeling of gothic inspired simplicity.

Old Liverpool Court House Old Liverpool Court House

Old Liverpool Court House

The old Liverpool courthouse is located at the corner of Moore and Bigge streets (251 Bigge Street) Liverpool. The first part of the building is believed to have been built in the 1820’sThe first part of the building is believed to have been built in the 1820s and added to in the 1850s (although debate rages about the construction date). Although listed for demolition in 1890, it served as a working court house until 1972 and its interior still retains its original character.

The court house premises are leased out to a private company and it is unavailable to be visited.

Old Liverpool Town Centre

Old memorial swimming pool, old  memorial swimming pool 2 Old memorial swimming pool, old  memorial swimming pool 2

Old memorial swimming pool, old memorial swimming pool 2

Rosebank Rosebank

Rosebank

St Luke's Church St Luke's Church

St Luke's Church

Georgian style designed by Francis Greenway. The Foundation stone was laid by Governor Lachlan Macquarie on Tuesday 7 April 1818. It was built with convict labour and made out of locally produced sandstock bricks and mainly cedar timber. The Rev. Robert Cartwright was appointed as the first Rector (Senior Minister) of St. Luke’s Liverpool and ministered 1819-1836.

The Liverpool Asylum and Liverpool College of TAFE The Liverpool Asylum and Liverpool College of TAFE

The Liverpool Asylum and Liverpool College of TAFE

Located in College Street, Liverpool, the building was originally designed by Francis Greenway but completed by another Government architect it was begun in the early 1820s and opened in 1830. It stands as an iconic building recognised by many. Its history spans the convict years, a time when it was run by the Benevolent Society and another period when it served as a government asylum for the infirm and the destitute. In the twentieth century it became a conventional state hospital with special provision for elderly men. It was not a psychiatric hospital, but a place for the sick and needy of all ages. The building is now the home of the Liverpool College of TAFE.

Westfields Shopping Centre Westfields Shopping Centre

Westfields Shopping Centre